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Author Archives: Kellas

News: Art History and Blue Jeans

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For something so everyday, so common, so fashionable, it’s a wonder that historians still haven’t figured out quite where the common denim blue jean comes from. Well now, where fashion historian have failed, it seems art historians may have succeeded in the discovering of a 17th-century northern Italian artist dubbed the “Master of the Blue Jeans.”   Unsurprisingly, the running ... Read More »

Chronicles: Eldridge Street Synagogue

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Opening its doors in 1887, The Eldridge Street Synagogue is one of the earliest synagogues in the U.S. Built by brother Peter and Francis William Herter, the brothers also constructed many other Lower East Side commission, into which they incorporated elements from the synagogue such as stars of David.   The synagogue’s grandious features were lauded in locals papers at ... Read More »

Museyon’s Guide to the Weekend

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  Celebrate: This weekend is Yom Kippur, so for all our Jewish friends, Happy Day of Atonement and you’re welcome- we skipped writing about the new cookbooks out this weekend. But if you are into self-torture, here’s a list from CBS entitled: Yom Kippur: 10 Foods We Can’t Wait to Eat.   Watch: This is a great weekend for movie ... Read More »

News: A Skeptic’s Progress

Mark Twain

From September 17 through January 2, 2011, The Morgan and The New York Public Library are holding a joint exhibition of the late, great American author Samuel Langhorne Clemens—better known by his pen name, Mark Twain. “Mark Twain was the quintessential American author, humorist, lecturer, essayist, and master of satire. Twain enjoyed immense public popularity during his lifetime and became ... Read More »

Chronicles: Castle Clinton

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  In the early 1800s, tensions were high with the newly ousted British and to protect itself, America had started building forts along its capital, New York City. Castle Clinton, or the West Battery as it was then known, was one of those forts. The fort was built on a man made island right off the west coast of Manhattan ... Read More »

Chronicles: Gracie Mansion

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  In 1799, a prosperous New York merchant named Archibald Gracie built a country house overlooking a bend in the East River, five miles north of the City. Financial failure forced Gracie to sell his house, which then went through a series of owners until landing in the hands of the City of New York in 1896, which made its ... Read More »

News: The Golden Age of Dutch Painting in Bilbao

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From October 8th through February 13th, The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao will be host to The Golden Age of Dutch and Flemish Painting from the Städel Museum in Frankfurt, Germany. Founded in 1816, the Städel Museum is home to one of Europe’s most important collections of 17th-century art, with a particular emphasis on Dutch and Flemish painting. This genre constituted the ... Read More »

Museyon’s Guide to…BFI London Film Festival

Lynch

The program for the 54th BFI London Film Festival, launched today by Artistic Director Sandra Hebron, showcases an array of highly anticipated films by both established and emerging talent from around the world. Held over 16 days, the festival will screen a total of 197 features and 112 shorts, including 11 World, 23 International and 33 European premieres, many presented ... Read More »

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