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Museyon’s Guide to the Weekend

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Celebrate: It’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday so that (hopefully) means that you have a three day weekend! Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is: ‘What are you doing for others?’”
 
Each year, Americans across the country answer that question by coming together on the King Holiday to serve their neighbors and communities. Take a look at the MLK Day of Service website and see where you can volunteer.
 
Watch:
Barney’s Version – Take a ride through the life and memories of Barney Panofsky, a hard-drinking, cigar-smoking, foulmouthed 65-year old hockey fanatic and television producer, as he reflects on his life’s successes and (numerous) gaffes and failures as the final chapters of his own existence come sharply into focus.
 


The Green Hornet – Driven by the murder of a close friend and the realization that his media empire is infested with ruthless heroin smugglers, Britt Reid, aka the Green Hornet and his human weapon Kato jump into action on a heart-pounding quest to rid the city of this mob once and for all.
 

 
A Somewhat Gentle Man -Ulrik (Stellan Skarsgård) is a somewhat gentle man. He has no special wishes and makes no demands. He does not give too much thought to what he does either. If he’s given some food and a place to sleep, he will give people what they want in return. Whether this be a little affection or a killing. Ulrik has killed some people and crippled a few. It’s all part of the job when you’re a gangster. Just like doing time. Now Ulrik is out again. Reluctantly… And Jensen is waiting on the outside. He’s a boss with professional pride, and it is important for Jensen that Ulrik kills the snitch that ratted him out.
 

 
Read:
Zombie Spaceship Wasteland: A Book by Patton Oswalt – Comedian Oswalt (The King of Queens, Caprica) offers up a collection of colorful essays ranging in topic from his experiences working at a movie theater to sends-ups of eccentric relatives, including a grandmother who gives exceedingly odd birthday gifts. To delve into the book is to take a tour of Oswalt’s delightfully offbeat mind: he shares with readers what he was doing to procrastinate while writing certain chapters, suggests some truly morbid greeting cards, and parodies the vampire craze in comic-book form. The title is a reference to Oswalt’s theory that creative teens gravitate toward three subjects for their early stories: zombies, spaceships, or wastelands. Oswalt found himself drawn toward wastelands, a natural choice for a comedian who likes to poke fun at society. Oswalt is a wonderfully descriptive writer, vividly evoking his zombielike coworker at the theater, a grim Canadian comedy club, and the wanderings of his teen imagination with sharp, sardonic prose., Booklist

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