Home » Author Archives: Charles Bahne

Author Archives: Charles Bahne

The Life and Death of a Free Thinker

Anne Hutchinson preaching at her house

An uncontested election is a sign of democracy at work, but America wasn’t always the land of the free. When the first European settlers arrived in the New World, religion and superstition ruled the land, and the rights we take for granted today were a long way away. Anne Hutchinson was a Puritan settler who came to America in 1634 ... Read More »

Book Launch with Charles Bahne

Charlie Chills with Mayor Curley

Celebrate Chronicles of Old Boston with author Charles Bahne, June 13, at 6 P.M. at the historic Old South Meeting House. Charlie returns to the Old South to share stories from his latest guidebook, which features 29 chapters on the Puritans, patriots and politicians who shaped the “City on a Hill” plus eight waiting tours. Whether you were born and ... Read More »

100 Years of Fenway

fenway

Our Chronicles of Old Boston may be brand new, but the city itself has a long and colorful history. And April 12, 2012, marks the 100th anniversary of one of the city’s most famous legends: Fenway Park. Baseball’s oldest — and most legendary — working baseball park has seen thousands of games over the years, including the Red Sox’s curse-breaking ... Read More »

The Fife Is Right: The Seventh Annual Old South History Challenge

OSMH Steeple Image 2 Courtesy of Julie Sterling Photography

Calling all history buffs! Want to learn while laughing? This Wednesday, April 4, Boston landmark the Old South Meeting House hosts its seventh annual Fife is Right. This hilarious quiz show pits two teams of history experts–including our own Chronicles of Old New York author Charlie Bahne–against each other in a fun-filled trivia contest. This year’s theme, “Underground Boston,” features ... Read More »

Spotlight On: Isabella Gardner Museum, Boston

boston-gardner-museum-592hs71910

The Isabella Gardner Museum is equally known for what it doesn’t have as what it does. In 1990, two men dressed as police officers broke into the famed museum in Boston and stole five Degas, three Rembrandts and a Vermeer, along with four other works, from off the wall and disappeared into the night, never to be seen again. For ... Read More »

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